Canon Cameras

Seiki Kogaku (now Canon) began to develop and subsequently to produce rangefinder cameras with the Kwanon prototype in 1933, based on the Leica II 35mm camera, with separate rangefinder and view finder systems (3 windows). Production began with the Hansa Canon on the Leica III format through WWII. Post war Canon resumed production of pre-war designs in early 1946 with the JII viewfinder and the S1 rangefinder. But in late 1946 they introduced the SII which departed from the Leica design by offering a combined viewfinder/rangefinder system, reducing the windows on the front of the camera to two. However, in most other respects these cameras remained visually similar to the Leica III.

In 1987, Canon introduced the EOS Single-lens reflex camera system along with the EF lens-mount standard to replace the 16-year-old FD lens-mount standard; EOS became the sole SLR camera-system used by Canon today. Canon also used EOS for its digital SLR cameras. All current film and digital SLR cameras produced by Canon today use the EOS autofocus system. Canon introduced this system in 1987 along with the EF lens mount standard. The last non-EOS based SLR camera produced by Canon, the Canon T90 of 1986, is widely regarded as the template for the EOS line of camera bodies, although the T90 employed the older FD lens-mount standard.

Coming soon – a directory of suppliers of Canon Cameras in South Africa